Piano forte

Piano forte
Piano forte
Piano forte
Piano forte

Piano forte

Every now and then comes an architect with a very unique vision of the world, a vision they invite us to live in. When Renzo Piano co-designed the Pompidou Center in Paris, the world was at awe. The New York Times described it as a building that “turned the architecture world upside down.” From the New York Times Building and the Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre to the Stavros Niarchos Foundation in Athens, the Modern Wing of the Art Institute of Chicago and, most recently, the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan or the Shard in London, the tallest building in the European Union, all his creations are united by a characteristic sense of lightness, and an interplay between tradition and invention, function and context.

Piano forte

Every now and then comes an architect with a very unique vision of the world, a vision they invite us to live in. When Renzo Piano co-designed the Pompidou Center in Paris, the world was at awe. The New York Times described it as a building that “turned the architecture world upside down.” From the New York Times Building and the Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre to the Stavros Niarchos Foundation in Athens, the Modern Wing of the Art Institute of Chicago and, most recently, the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan or the Shard in London, the tallest building in the European Union, all his creations are united by a characteristic sense of lightness, and an interplay between tradition and invention, function and context.

Piano forte

Every now and then comes an architect with a very unique vision of the world, a vision they invite us to live in. When Renzo Piano co-designed the Pompidou Center in Paris, the world was at awe. The New York Times described it as a building that “turned the architecture world upside down.” From the New York Times Building and the Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre to the Stavros Niarchos Foundation in Athens, the Modern Wing of the Art Institute of Chicago and, most recently, the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan or the Shard in London, the tallest building in the European Union, all his creations are united by a characteristic sense of lightness, and an interplay between tradition and invention, function and context.

At the age of 80, the Italian maestro has cemented his place as one of the greatest architects of our times but still retains all of his enthusiasm and kindness. As he confided to Philip Jodidio, author of the book Piano. Complete Works 1966–Today published by Taschen, “I think at a certain age, one can discover that there is what the French call the ‘fil rouge,’ a kind of red thread that relates one building to another over time. In my case, I believe it is about lightness and the art of building.” Not only does the Italian magician of architecture and his red thread redefine the way we look and feel in built spaces, but he also proves to share his talent for humanitarian projects as well, like as Emergency Children’s Surgery Center in Entebbe, Uganda, and the Children’s Hospice in Bologna, Italy.

At the age of 80, the Italian maestro has cemented his place as one of the greatest architects of our times but still retains all of his enthusiasm and kindness. As he confided to Philip Jodidio, author of the book Piano. Complete Works 1966–Today published by Taschen, “I think at a certain age, one can discover that there is what the French call the ‘fil rouge,’ a kind of red thread that relates one building to another over time. In my case, I believe it is about lightness and the art of building.” Not only does the Italian magician of architecture and his red thread redefine the way we look and feel in built spaces, but he also proves to share his talent for humanitarian projects as well, like as Emergency Children’s Surgery Center in Entebbe, Uganda, and the Children’s Hospice in Bologna, Italy.

At the age of 80, the Italian maestro has cemented his place as one of the greatest architects of our times but still retains all of his enthusiasm and kindness. As he confided to Philip Jodidio, author of the book Piano. Complete Works 1966–Today published by Taschen, “I think at a certain age, one can discover that there is what the French call the ‘fil rouge,’ a kind of red thread that relates one building to another over time. In my case, I believe it is about lightness and the art of building.” Not only does the Italian magician of architecture and his red thread redefine the way we look and feel in built spaces, but he also proves to share his talent for humanitarian projects as well, like as Emergency Children’s Surgery Center in Entebbe, Uganda, and the Children’s Hospice in Bologna, Italy.

Piano’s career is a thrilling journey through the beauty and very essence of architecture, that is also the subject of a hit exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts, in London that focuses on 16 key buildings to explore how the Renzo Piano Building Workshop designs buildings “piece by piece”, making deft use of form, material, and engineering to achieve a precise and yet poetic elegance.

Renzo Piano (born in 1937) studied at the University of Florence and at Milan’s Polytechnic Institute. A recipient of the RIBA Gold Medal in 1989 and the 1998 Pritzker Prize, Piano’s most iconic projects include the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Shard in London, and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. He has his main offices in his native Genoa and in Paris.

Piano’s career is a thrilling journey through the beauty and very essence of architecture, that is also the subject of a hit exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts, in London that focuses on 16 key buildings to explore how the Renzo Piano Building Workshop designs buildings “piece by piece”, making deft use of form, material, and engineering to achieve a precise and yet poetic elegance.

Renzo Piano (born in 1937) studied at the University of Florence and at Milan’s Polytechnic Institute. A recipient of the RIBA Gold Medal in 1989 and the 1998 Pritzker Prize, Piano’s most iconic projects include the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Shard in London, and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. He has his main offices in his native Genoa and in Paris.

Piano’s career is a thrilling journey through the beauty and very essence of architecture, that is also the subject of a hit exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts, in London that focuses on 16 key buildings to explore how the Renzo Piano Building Workshop designs buildings “piece by piece”, making deft use of form, material, and engineering to achieve a precise and yet poetic elegance.

Renzo Piano (born in 1937) studied at the University of Florence and at Milan’s Polytechnic Institute. A recipient of the RIBA Gold Medal in 1989 and the 1998 Pritzker Prize, Piano’s most iconic projects include the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, the Shard in London, and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. He has his main offices in his native Genoa and in Paris.

The Book: Piano. Complete Works 1966–Today, Philip Jodidio, Hardcover with fold-out, 30.8 x 39 cm, 688 pages, published by www.taschen.com

The Exhibition: Renzo Piano, The Art of Making Buildings runs until the 20th of January 2019, organized by the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in collaboration with Renzo Piano Building Workshop and the Fondazione Renzo Piano.

The Book: Piano. Complete Works 1966–Today, Philip Jodidio, Hardcover with fold-out, 30.8 x 39 cm, 688 pages, published by www.taschen.com

The Exhibition: Renzo Piano, The Art of Making Buildings runs until the 20th of January 2019, organized by the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in collaboration with Renzo Piano Building Workshop and the Fondazione Renzo Piano.

The Book: Piano. Complete Works 1966–Today, Philip Jodidio, Hardcover with fold-out, 30.8 x 39 cm, 688 pages, published by www.taschen.com

The Exhibition: Renzo Piano, The Art of Making Buildings runs until the 20th of January 2019, organized by the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in collaboration with Renzo Piano Building Workshop and the Fondazione Renzo Piano.